DIY Rose Cuttings

rose-cuttings

Propagating roses by cuttings is easy. Some say the secret of success is the humble potato! Before planting rose cuttings, push the bottom end into a small potato, which keeps the cuttings moist as they develop roots. It sounds crazy, but apparently it works really well.
Have any of you tried this?

  • Dig a trench 6in (15cm) deep; place an inch or two of sharp sand in the bottom.
  • Choose a stem – about the thickness of a pencil – from the rose you wish to propagate.
  • The cutting should be about 9in (23cm) long. Cut just below a bud at the base.
  • Insert each cutting so that it is two-thirds buried, making sure that its base is well into the sharp sand. Firm the sand around the base, to exclude as much air as possible. Cuttings should be set about 6in (15cm) apart.
  • Replace soil into the trench and firm it in place; don’t damage the cuttings as you do this. Keep the cuttings watered throughout summer. By November they should have rooted well and be ready for transplanting.

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21 Responses to “DIY Rose Cuttings”

  1. Dwayne says:

    Does it work for other cuttings as well??

  2. Gordon says:

    I presume this would be done in spring / early summer in order for the cuttings to develop enough roots for fall planting.

  3. Victoria says:

    I only got potatos growing up……

  4. MANJULA says:

    For what kind of plants this cuttings can be used?

  5. Patty says:

    I live in an apartment but I’d really like to try this.. any idea?

  6. Elaine Young says:

    I have 20 rose cuttings in pots. Some large and others only 7-10 cm long I crushed the rooting end and dipped it in rooting compound. No worm wee yet. They either do or they don’t. A friend gave be cuttings just to push into the ground. Remember I used 1/2 a peat block mixed with the same amount of river sand for all my cuttings.Mostly I used worm wee for rooting and the results were fantastic.
    5 minutes ago · Like

    Elaine Young Great results iIf not leave the ends in worm wee for 20 minutes. I’ve been told you can also use a Vit C tab dissolved in water!
    2 minutes ago · Like

    Elaine Young All potting soil here is peat free! but you can but compost for each different type of plant! Very confusing. (England)

  7. Cathy S. Clarke says:

    I have tried the potatoes 3 different times, and each time I grew potatoes! I am not sure if I did something wrong?

    • Keith Williams says:

      They left out unless you want volunteer potatoes you must cut the eyes out.

      • Michelle Luna says:

        Thank you X a million for mentioning this, I wouldn’t have thought of it on my own, but now realize how much sense that makes!

  8. SJM says:

    I have a question – what is meant by “Sharp” sand? Does it mean leveling sand or foundation sand rather than beach sand?

  9. yemen says:

    No entendí lo del corte de la planta es cerca de algún brote o llema

    • Colleen Martin-Fabius says:

      Sharp sand is also called masonry sand, builders sand and is from crushed rock often, unlike beach sand which is rounded and doesn’t drain well.

  10. Kell says:

    All I grew was potatoes. Same for my mum. I dipped other rose cuttings in honey before putting them in a pot and most of them grew beautifully

  11. peggy says:

    You can use shorter cuttings place deep in soil and cover with a Mason jar

  12. Tiffany says:

    Any good ideas on how to get roses to grown from seeds vs bulbs?

  13. Connie says:

    what is wormwee?

    • Hank says:

      It’s a substitute for updog.

    • Marc says:

      Worm wee is a name brand liquid organic fertilizer concentrate made using vermicomposting (composting with worms). I just happened to know this but if I every wonder “What the heck it that?” I just Google it.
      Just yesterday I was looking for a part that was supposed to be in my warehouse. All I had was a bunch of numbers and letters.I typed them into google, hit enter, and BAMM! there are a bunch of pictures of what I am looking for in the results.

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