Solar-powered floating farms that can produce 20 tons of vegetables every day

Smart-Floating-Farms

This next design is an innovative and new approach to traditional farming. It is an amazing solar powered floating island which is covered with several farms and was created by Forward Thinking Architecture. The floating islands work in a very energy efficient way, harvesting sunlight and rainwater, this way creating a sustainable environment. These floating farms can produce even 20 tons of vegetables daily. The great advantage of this invention is that such farms can be built all around the world, even in places that are hardly accessible or not suitable for farming. This will encourage locals to grow their own food and reduce the amount of imported goods, saving money and giving birth to lots of new jobs. To learn more about these amazing floating farms, check the link below for additional details.

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 Each module measure 200×350 meters and can connect with other modules via walkways.

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Each module is estimated to produce 8,152 tons of vegetables a year and 1,703 tons of fish a year.

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97 Responses to “Solar-powered floating farms that can produce 20 tons of vegetables every day”

  1. Tamer Salama says:

    Hi all
    this is a good idea if I want building it in Egypt how can you help me with support and how much it costs?
    many thanks
    yours
    tamer salama

    • Adam says:

      Hello Tamer

      My name is Adam. I am from Australia and I work internationally with sustainability projects including food production systems.

      If you would like some support to design and plan a project like this, with the floating food production systems, let me know.

      My team can provide services to help.
      Website at naturalhabitats.com.au and pacificsanctuaries.com

      Kind regards
      Adam
      EM: adam@naturalhabitats.com.au

  2. George mwebembezi says:

    Please send me.update, iam so inspired.Thx

  3. EMRUL HASSAN says:

    Dear sir.

    Thanks for the idea . I would likeSolar-powered floating farms that can produce 20 tons of vegetables. To establish this type of farm in my country where should I get the full project details ?

    • Germán Maldonado says:

      I believe this is just a design.
      Floating farms already exist for fish. I would not be difficult to build one for farming since solar paneling and low voltage electronics are available worldwide.

  4. GroGeo says:

    It’s great to see companies like Forward Thinking Architecture designing buildings that have very little impact on the environment, if any. GroGeo has designed and already built a ‘near zero carbon footprint’, indoor hybrid greenhouse in Colorado. We hope to see more companies around the globe commit to sustainable agriculture.

  5. Siva Das says:

    Please forgive me for being sceptical but I would think the extraction of and manufacturing materials to build and transport the materials would be merely additional damage to the environment and economy. The people who are to work on them would have to travel there and the tons of food supposedly produced would still have to be transported and distributed so it hardly seems like it would solve any problems at all ..merely creating more problems pretending to solve another.

    • Monika says:

      I think you have a point…..I am also wondering where the waste products go?…..

    • Lynny Bishop says:

      I agree, There seems to be no area for storage for all equipment and machinery, growing seedling plants, packing room for vegetables, wastage would be a problem, lunchrooms, restrooms, office space, the list goes on and on.

    • Nick Lento says:

      That is a negative, irrational and antagonistic trolling of the actual idea.

      The project as described would provide massive quantities of food in a relatively tiny space utilizing mostly renewable solar energy. The idea is precisely to have food grown locally thereby making the supply chains shorter, more efficient, cleaner and cheaper.

      A green planet Earth doesn’t mean eliminating all indudtrial production and/or transportation. The idea is to do it cleanly and in an overall greenhouse gas neutral manner. This project would be a net conservator of greenhuse gases as opposed to existing food production methods.

      • Le Dinh Dzung says:

        Waste treatment , water treatment can be solved. The system used available resources, clean, and sustainable.

    • Michael says:

      you hit the nail on the head

    • Toshio says:

      Incredibly negative response to this innovative thinking. I suppose you prefer the current food production model?

    • Thomas says:

      Hi Siva you are missing the point completely… the food produced currently ALREADY has these same distribution issues on top of their own carbon footprint… this system is a circular system where waste from the fish farm is used as fertiliser for the plants and vice versa. The carbon footprint is reduced and Its a great solution to a growing problem.

  6. Simon See says:

    Hi if someone in Malaysia interested in the project, do let me know so I can join in the project. Thanks.

  7. matt h says:

    Great idea! What happens when a big wave hits?

    • D Harbers says:

      I agree – unless they are on reasonably small lakes how will they handle storms which are predicted to get more intense? They would need to be remarkably robust and movable to avoid typhoons, cyclones, hurricanes and other storm activity …

    • Valerie says:

      Exactly what I was thinking, a hurricane could destroy this whole type project.

  8. Sandy says:

    I’m all for advancing technology but at the same time it’s immensely sad that this is becoming necessary. As farmland is slowly eaten away, sold off, built on, we won’t have land left to grow vegetables any more. Years and years down the road will we then have to worry about running out of room on the water?? Space on this earth is not finite people. New, untouched ground does not just pop up somewhere when we tear down trees and build that new shopping center/townhome community/commercial development.

  9. debra hinkle says:

    I am interested in acquiring a starter kit and need price info.

  10. Diane says:

    Creative, but I don’t see any defenses against sea lions, any of several bird species, or any pest that would invade and destroy the produce and fish being grown on these floating farms. Nice idea, but needs more work.

    • bill says:

      not to mention when the sea becomes super rough with high swells during storms.

    • Lyn Uthe says:

      I can understand your point Diane. However, I am sure appropriate adaptations could be made for a particular location. Globally we each have different ocean currents, weather, species to deal with. We need to encourage and support projects, maybe not perfect initially. In reality, we have little choice for the mess we have made of this planet. Let us try to improve its health and our situation.

  11. Itsamoe says:

    20 tone daily
    You will need 38 acres
    That’s would cost you around 15 to 18 million dollar
    Good luck

  12. Travis says:

    What about in the event if hurricanes?? Are these reinforced , and anchored, well enough to sustain a heavy impact?

    • DALLAS says:

      weather is a big issue and finding calm water sites eliminates most sea side location and rivers , so finding lakes or Dams are all that is left.

  13. Richard says:

    So each module is the length of an aircraft carrier? How does it compare in cost to a similar sized vessel? I take it you are talking about freshwater applications? Tides and larger waves on the ocean would make this idea unfeasible.

  14. Attila says:

    Bad idea ??‍♂️ Not only is it that solar panels are very toxic for environment difficult to recycle and need be replaced often.. but the run off to waste water from farms is very damaging. Let’s count in the factors of having to ship in minerals and nutrients for the plants to grow. This takes mining and delivering. Another capitalist idea. It just so happens many of the nutrients and minerals used in farming today is a byproduct of oil industry. Not to mention pesticide. Let’s stop farming where we shouldn’t let’s stop fighting nature it will continue to fight us back.

  15. Attila says:

    Bad idea ??‍♂️ Not only is it that solar panels are very toxic for environment difficult to recycle and need be replaced often.. but the run off to waste water from farms is very damaging. Let’s count in the factors of having to ship in minerals and nutrients for the plants to grow. This takes mining and delivering. Another capitalist idea. It just so happens many of the nutrients and minerals used in farming today is a byproduct of oil industry. Not to mention pesticide. Let’s stop farming where we shouldn’t let’s stop fighting nature it will continue to fight us back.

  16. Betty says:

    How to withstand terrible storms???

  17. Trevor Munian says:

    Hi If we want to setup something similar in South Africa. What are the requirements? Process, Cost, etc.

  18. Geela says:

    This looks really interesting, but post is from 2015.
    A couple of concerns: fish farming is one of the world’s most damaging industries due to medication & diseases from fish grown in unnatural environment at too close quarters, having to be medicated & these spreading to wild fish & into the sea around & further. How is this design different? Thanks
    Also the advertising on this page is very much toxic chemicals industries, & related Corporations Bayer & also Biomass combustion energy is not green at all as it is currently more wood than we can grow, so trees are being sacrificed from other countries & shipped across at great cost & environmental expense.. Who is funding this project??

  19. lesley albien says:

    Presumably this only works in freshwater lakes?

  20. Margaret Delano says:

    Would love to get blue prints copies

  21. Nick Lento says:

    That is a negative, irrational and antagonistic trolling of the actual idea.

    The project as described would provide massive quantities of food in a relatively tiny space utilizing mostly renewable solar energy. The idea is precisely to have food grown locally thereby making the supply chains shorter, more efficient, cleaner and cheaper.

    A green planet Earth doesn’t mean eliminating all indudtrial production and/or transportation. The idea is to do it cleanly and in an overall greenhouse gas neutral manner. This project would be a net conservator of greenhuse gases as opposed to existing food production methods.

  22. Rose Margiotta says:

    Any time anyone has a humanistic idea there will be sceptics. Good for you to think ahead. Humanity needs all the help you can give to the next generation. I’m older and did my part every day of my life in small ways and when I leave this life it’s nice to know you younger people care so much to do this venture and more. God bless you.

  23. Hennie says:

    I’m retired but would like to be involved in any duch development….very exciting idea and the solution to some if the worlds problems….call me anytime!

  24. Nasser Yahya Allamki says:

    BrainChild of this organization should advise FAO-UN or ministry of Agriculture of Developing Counttries.It will be a very big favor for Humanity.God Bless This Organization for the good Work. Pls Help?

  25. Marcelo says:

    I’ll still just doing the same thing on land and not worrying about such logistics issues… also it’s not sustainable if you need to import stuff from many kms away

  26. John Tomson says:

    This is incredible

  27. Ahmed says:

    Hi If we want to setup something similar in Maldives. What are the requirements? Process, Cost, etc

  28. Yamila Acosta-Flamma says:

    Hi, do you export the islands to Europe? I need to manage one or two of those . I live at the sea. Does it work with salty water? I do not think so… plants need sweet water.
    Please let me know if you deliver those island ready built.

  29. Sara says:

    I see a handful of insightful comments actually concerned with the environmental impact this idea could have on our oceans. We’ve already ravaged so much of the earth…..better everyone just figure out how to grow their own. Not a fan.

  30. Heather Schafer says:

    I think its a great idea. With land becoming more scarce. By the looks of it , its completely covered in so the sea critters wont have access to it. And the bugs and insects would be minimal. What makes it different to on the land? It doesnt matter which way you go, people still have to travel to work a farm, also as for cartage, you still need it for on the land as well as on water. It generates its own power. But the fresh water to water the plants is a question mark. Rain water tanks are great but there is that chance you would run out. So there would have to be a pipeline from the mainland to sustain everything. But on the whole a great idea.

  31. Lisabeth Sterling says:

    I have often heard the phrase, “A boat is a hole in the water into which you throw money”
    Land based might be cheaper. And, fresh water waste from the fish could be used to fertilize crop plants.

  32. Erik Pihl says:

    This looks like bullshit

    Why use solar cells instead of just direct light, the latter has higher efficiency and lower cost.

    Fish farming is connected with a lot of negative environmental impact such as local pollution, pests and farmed fish escaping. Some species eat more wild fish than what is produced in the farm. Has this been carefully considered?

    What impact do fliating farms have locally? – they will most likely shadow and kill the sea grass, reef or other life below.

    I advice anyone to scrutinize these types of design solutions carefully before buying into something that is expensive and creates more problems than they solve.

  33. Arben Caslli says:

    This is a great iea and may be it needs some more support on teh take off steps. How can we have more details aboiut this project and how we can help?

    regards
    Arben

  34. Charlie says:

    Humanity does not need all the help it can get. It’s thriving and overtaking everything else. Other species need all the help they can get. We are pushing everything else into extinction.

  35. Charlie says:

    This is a good question. How does it withstand waves and/or storms? How do the vegetables withstand sea spray?

  36. Joseph Kwesi Sarpong says:

    This is good and I wish I have the opportunity to experience and build pilot one in Ghana. We have large bodies of water and this technology will work great. Whom do I contact.

  37. Bailey Seyler says:

    I will be acquiring my scuba diving liscence. If anyone knows where these are being built or having being built could you point me in the right direction to get in contact with the owners? I’m sure they would need divers for maintenance

  38. Andrew Love says:

    Inteligro utilizes aeroponics and our engineers are also capable of building such structures at very cost efficient and quick to scale.

    Reach me at my email, or if you’d like to collaborate on projects we are actively willing and able to quote out projects.

    We’re have designed intelligent homes that focus around organic and 0 cost energy solutions reducing the footprint of waste/ pollution/ carbon.

    Please reach me and my team.

  39. Johan Lewin says:

    Brilliant initiative please send detailed business plan.
    Kindest regards
    Johan

  40. Dan says:

    I am very interested in ordering a project floating farm. Please send me a detail, website to go look and order from.

  41. Michael says:

    Of course we all realize this is not a “new” invention but more of and extrapolation of an old idea. Floating Farms were first created by….(drum roll please….), yup that’s right, Native Americans once again, idea came out of the floating farms of the Aztecs/Mayans/Incas, add the solar power idea and WHAM , a new idea is born and if this serves as any indication, we will be “reviewing” many more Indigenous ways to survive the next millennia…

  42. Ivan says:

    good afternoon. I’m interested in solar panels that withstand long work in the ocean with salt water

  43. Kathleen Lake says:

    I hate to be the skeptic here, but I see at least 3 potential problems with this system. 1. It would be cost prohibitive and thus likely only serve those who could already afford it. 2. It would be a potential source of water polutants including fertulizer runoff and sedimentation like other fish farms. 3. It would not provide an employment or income source for low income people like conventional farming because it would be high-tech and/or automated.

  44. Warren Jones says:

    This sounds great my company is a funding source for projects like this. We would greatly be interested in hearing more about this type of farming and funding these projects

  45. Elie says:

    If you use solar panels to turn sunlight into electricity, and then into LED light, you’ll be left with less than 10% of the energy you started with.

    Compare that to a simple cheap glass roof: over 75% of the sun’s energy will reach the plants.

    So here’s a better idea: just make it a simple greenhouse with just a few solar panels on the side to power any electronics.

  46. Mary Rose says:

    Sir,

    I am working in a government agency which builds dams and irrigation facilities for the farmers. We have big reservoirs that we can use to build that solar floating farms. Can you help our designers about the information?

    Respectfully yours,

    Mary Rose

  47. David Lau says:

    Please send me info and contact, we want to have this built in our country as well…

  48. JJ says:

    At last! I came up with this idea about 20 years ago! If not longer! Fruit farms also! Will also help climate change on Earth! Great!!!

  49. Jamie Bryn says:

    This was 5 years ago, has it started working yet? Curious, because it looks awesome.

  50. Craig Winner says:

    As designed this is not feasible. A flat bottomed inflexible structure of this size could not withstand surface wave action. I also wonder about the systems which would be used to clean the tremendous amount of marine growth on the bottom of these farms.

  51. Josh says:

    I like idea. I would modify. Leverage wave powered electric generation so that it can withstand and leverage turbulent lakes. Idea seems to be most suited for fresh water as salt air could corrode components and not work for plants. Lake water with fish waste in water makes it easier to hydrate plants and faster for optimal growth. We should test this in MN 10,000 lakes.

  52. Barry Huddlestun says:

    Interesting But. Waves are common on any body of water. So much so that they can sink giant ships. I believe that we have an over looked opportunity on the roofs of large buildings. We can create closed green houses even on the roofs of our grocery stores. It minimizes the cost of bringing the food directly to the customers. We can scavenge heat from the buildings because many plants are hearty and can grow well in cooler climates. The sun shines for most of the required cycle everywhere but can be supplemented with solar light. These urban and industrial roof top farms would be far easier to work with people living close by too.

  53. Richard says:

    Work with forgien investors looking for american higher risk investment opportunities. Would like more information and some feasibility/cost data.

  54. Dr Robert Johnson says:

    I take it that hydrponics is used for the growing and waste is recycled as a nutrient for the fish farming. We have access to an inland waterways that would be possibly suitable, big enough to substain a number of modules, close enough to a market requiring fresh vegetables. This area is also one of the best inland water ways for wild Barramundi and free of crocodiles. I am interested in exploring the concept further. We are located inland of the Whitsundays in North Queensland Australia

  55. Andrew says:

    Who wouldn’t shade the crop of sun radiation to convert at best 15% (because that’s the efficiency of solar panels) of it into electricity?

  56. Srinivas Bhaskar chaganti says:

    Dear Sir,
    Each kwh is Max 3 cents or 2 rupees a unit or kwh
    Regards
    Chaganti
    +91- 8555045244

  57. Srinivas Bhaskar chaganti says:

    Green power for life Time just 3 cents a kwh
    Regards
    Chaganti
    8555045244

  58. Scott Barsten says:

    Can somebody make one of these for cannabis or hemp and place them around Japan!
    Please and thank you, the children and grand children of the earth will thank you.

  59. Meesejoanna@gmail.com says:

    And covering up the sea, blocking out the light what repurcussion will that have? Because it starts with one and soon you will never see any water anywhere again

  60. Micha says:

    Sounds very cool.
    Send me some more specifics as to the timelines and cooperative alliances email is within.Thanks
    M

  61. Hayley says:

    Hope you are using organic pesticides & fertilisers.

  62. Abraham Fourie says:

    Very good Wil work in South Africa to feed the poor harvest Wil be difficult due to exes

  63. Architect says:

    The issue is you can’t grow crops out at sea because of the salt water in the air.

  64. Kathryn Holloway says:

    Hi can you email me information regarding the design and cost effective and thank you

  65. Jim Couch says:

    What happens if a storm comes along?

  66. M Moore says:

    To do fresh water, you would need a very large lake. It’s a great idea! After a few searches, I found out that there are a number of vegetables that can be grown in salt water hydroponic systms. Float them in the ocean!

  67. Vikram THAKUR says:

    Great idea would like to have details to assess feasibility and location appropriate for this project.

  68. Vikram THAKUR says:

    Great idea would like to have details to assess feasibility and location appropriate for this project in India.

  69. Steve Smith says:

    Love your comments Adam. If you get a chance, please check out my dream of an eco-city in Far North NZ. Love to hear your thoughts on my crazy dream. Maybe we could work together on it?

  70. Matthew says:

    Hi Adam, Tamer asked how much your ideas cost to implement. You replied asking him to contact you for help. He did contact you for help (here) and you didn’t answer his question. Should I be suspicious that this isn’t a real idea and that your “harvest” is just a collection of email addresses that you can sell? If not then please be helpful and tells us how much your contraptions cost to buy and to run and what added value they generate.

  71. Johnny Widjaja says:

    Love the process…

  72. Jan Smith says:

    Could it become a whole ecosystem? Need pollinators and the plants they need.

  73. Ryan Meyers says:

    How are these systems moored and anchored to the sea floor? Seaflex offers an eco-friendly flexible mooring solution that works in all depths and any water level variation. Please let me know if interested in exploring. Thanks

  74. alex farrugia says:

    What about the weather what happen if a storm strike you find it in the bottom of the sea

  75. Steve McCabe says:

    Since the farming is done organically the waste products are not an issue they would be fed to the fish and respectively the fish byproducts would be fed to the plants. It is mostly a closed loop.. at the scale proposed and the level of technology available for production housing employees is as lso not an issue. There would be ample human resources for such an opportunity as living on one of these facilities for weeks at a time, since most of the world’s population is within close distance of the oceans or an large bodies of fresh water it would only take a small amount of resources to make these facilities a viable economic and agricultural resource3

  76. Gracr says:

    I”d like to know if you have an existing project already and where is it located. Thank you.

  77. Emmanuel Quarshie says:

    I have a competitive edge for technology and innovation, am interested in this great idea and want to be part of this all way possible. Will be waiting earnestly for your call up or reply

  78. dave says:

    Where can I get more details?

  79. Surinder says:

    I am from New Delhi, India.
    How this technology can ne used in cities. Please guide

  80. Jerry says:

    This would have to be a platform that you move around the sea to keep out of hazardous weather systems so you would need reliable propulsion. That may be diesel engines , now you will have to be able to plant based fuel. Battery motors would add to much weight to be effective means of propulsion.

  81. Mary Ann says:

    Some people find a solution for every problem. Others find a problem for every solution

  82. Farouk tatanaki says:

    I would like to know more and very interested in making the development of the concept

  83. Matt says:

    This is the kind of forward thinking that inspires innovation the nay sayers need to stop picking get on board and help for solutions this is a world necessity and could inspire the next generation to do even more I want to be apart sign me up

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