This Young Man Has a Plan to Remove All Plastic From Oceans by 2050

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is one of the biggest environmental disasters of our time. But luckily some great minds are trying to clean it and reverse something thought to be irreversible. The Ocean Cleanup Project is led by Boyan Slat, a young entrepreneur, who together with his organization developed a tool that helps remove plastic from oceans in a more efficient way.
The organization was born 6 years ago, and its main mission was to clean the Great Pacific Garbage Patch, that in the meantime grow, becoming two times larger than Texas. If broken down to pieces, it is said that the Patch contains around 250 pieces of plastic for each person on Earth. This truly is a very alarming fact!

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Assembly yard & San Francisco

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The Ocean Cleanup Project first launched its revolutionary device in 2018 and it was a 2,000-foot-long U-shaped array, named “Wilson”. But unfortunately, its first attempt has been unsuccessful as shortly after powering it the device started throwing back plastic into the ocean and broke down. So, the organization had no other option, then to return “Wilson” to the port of San Francisco, to its starting point.

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BREAKING: The Ocean Cleanup raises 21.7 million USD in donations to start Pacific cleanup trials. Details to be announced on our The Next Phase event on May 11. Registration possible via link in bio until May 7.

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Boyan did not give up, and last summer he announced that they are ready to launch a new and improved device, that uses underwater parachutes to have better control over the movement of “Wilson”. This entire process of removing plastic from waters is a very hard one, as several years of research need to be done in advance before creating a functional and efficient clean-up device. Environmentalists all around the world are hoping that this new tool is going to work the way it was meant to and that we might just be getting one step closer to having plastic-free oceans.

 

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Our technology was born from a simple idea, yet it required countless iterations to bring it where it is today. We firmly believe in this continuous development process and we’re not afraid of going back to the whiteboard when there is a chance to improve upon ourselves. We are always open to external input and we now made it even easier for anybody to send us feedback. If you are an engineer, a researcher, a student or simply an innovative mind, and you think you could help us improve our technology, we invite you to use the form on our website to submit your input.

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Testing is key to our iterative design process, and with the latest series of scale model tests performed at the MARIN institute we have further validated design elements of System 001. Read the update on our website.

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A new major step was taken on the road to the cleanup when we signed the lease for our assembly yard (in Alameda). But there are many more to come, as we aim to deploy the very first cleanup system inside the Great Pacific Garbage Patch this summer. Follow our progress on the timeline to launch, as we finalize engineering, procurement and testing system components.

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