How To Build An Outdoor Cob Oven For $20


Technology has brought the art of making food to a new level which may in fact ruin someone on the long term if they don’t have the necessary knowledge of dealing without the appliances and devices at our disposal nowadays. Try baking something without fossil fuels or electricity for a week and you’ll find out how really hard that is. But if you’re lucky enough to have the space for a cob oven, you can make it just fine. For building the oven from scratch, you will need some hard work, positioning the stones for the foundation, continuing with filling with clay mortar, making the arch doorway and cob dome, and finishing with clay or sand mortar between the bricks. It could take you days, but with recycled materials, you would only spend some 20 $ on the entire structure. Then, you won’t have trouble baking a tasty pizza right into the wood-fired DIY oven. With some bread, tomatoes, peppers and cheese, you too could make a natural and delicious meal. All without technology! The DIY movement is surely the alternative.






24 Responses to “How To Build An Outdoor Cob Oven For $20”

  1. Katie says:

    Do you have any designs for solar ovens ?? Very interested

  2. DonnaRutledge-Goulden says:

    This doesn’t give you details on how to build this oven

  3. Tony says:

    Where are the instructions??

  4. Harold says:

    Google how to build a cob oven

    Googla how to cook in a cob oven

  5. Harold says:

    You can find all that information on my facebook group and tons of other info…. Even have about solar ovens

  6. Leslie Baracz says:


  7. Babs says:

    Just for the record: I had asthma as a child (living in the city, no wood smoke, no tobacco smoke in my household), then lived in a small rural community where we cooked and heated with wood for, like, 20 years, and I did not have asthma during that time except once when the rabbits we kept on our back porch were given some moldy hay. When husband realized what was happening, he got rid of the moldy hay, cleaned the hutches and gave the rabbits clean hay, and my asthma was gone by the next day. Later we moved back to town (no woodsmoke, no tobacco smoke in my house or anywhere I habitually went). Again, some asthma now and then. Just for the record, we have lived during those urban years with “clean” heating and cooking fuel, such as natural gas and electricity. Where did asthma come from? I’m just saying, there are other things that cause asthma besides wood smoke.

    I like the idea of using old glass bottles and used/leftover cinder block in the construction.

    But I still don’t understand what keeps this charming little oven made from sand and mud from melting when it rains. There must be some way to create one that’s weatherproof, otherwise people of ancient times would have had to rebuild their ovens every time there was some kind of precipitation. I know you have tarps over yours, but in the olden days tarps hadn’t been invented yet.

  8. Brad says:

    Why not just put the link to the instructions right at the onset of the article?

  9. Big daddy says:

    Yes. Very disappointing

  10. 3 ft clean says:

    On it! Started a couple of weeks ago and planning to have pizza (turkey & stuffing) for Christmas. Going forwards seems to be a good road to nowhere, yet going back to basics, using the (free) resources around you, and mashing up cob with your kids (or not) restores the soul. Everyone should try this.

  11. Indigo says:

    How well will this hold up in different climates? Say, rainy weather and the like. Thanks, great tutorial!

  12. alan says:

    There’s several ways this can be made.. instead of a clay base use concrete still use the glass bottles it they act like an insulator. Most of these ovens have a shelf either of stone or kinda surprised me this one didn’t show a shelf. It is tricky if you use stone it has to with hold temp with out can use the bricks like on dome and grout or mortar but I would drill two holes in the side of each brick an run rebar for added strength and protection.incase a brick has moisture and explodes the rebar will prevent the shelf two brick layers up from bottom then proceed with dome..also suggest a small chimney or opening on top from breathing and circulation of heat..most of these were built out of Adobe or mud and clay with straw blended and once built. Backed with high heat until dry and baked.this meant they would build a hot fire inside and outside and burn it for several days.this way is beautiful and lasts for centuries but maybe frowned on now a day’s because of primary oven baking so it will harden.these are the basic ovens every culture had some variance of this oven. Be creative you can make a whole kitchen this way and if done correctly only need one fire which would also be used to warm the house as well if it ever came to that.out door cooking indoor heat.or indoor,outdoor cooking.I have seen it many ways. But be creative have fun and be safe

  13. Kory says:

    Just go to YouTube plenty of videos on how to make one

  14. Derek Gjovig says:

    To be clear, the plans are $3… The construction materials are not…

  15. Heather says:

    The link for the instructions no longer works. Bummer.

  16. Gwen says:

    With the heat index hitting 110+ I’ve been thinking about an outdoor kitchen setup. This is a great idea to kick start the planning. Thank you.

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