Family Wraps Home In Greenhouse To Protect It From The Cold

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For all the reasons to make and maintain a greenhouse, the members of this family had the most creative one: to protect them from cold weather! It may seem like an unaesthetic choice, because the actual home is engulfed in the greenhouse. But the results are quite convincing: it can be -2°C outside and up to 20°C upstairs. An old summer house on the Stockholm archipelago was used for the creative approach. Using architect’s Bengt Warne concept of Naturhus, the owners covered their new home in 4 millimeter glass. What followed was a wrap-around garden and an interesting type of produce from Sweden’s point of view – tomatoes, cucumbers, figs. Explore the entire thing via the photos and videos provided here.

* In the video, Granmar mentions architect Bengt Warne’s influence in the 1990s since this is the date he reached a larger audience with his book release.

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The average temperature in Stockholm in January is -3°C (27°F). For Marie Granmar and Charles Sacilotto it can be much warmer thanks to the greenhouse that blankets their home. “For example at the end of January it can be -2°C outside and it can be 15 to 20°C upstairs,” explains Sacilotto.

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24 Responses to “Family Wraps Home In Greenhouse To Protect It From The Cold”

  1. Sonja Thompson Kuehnle says:

    What about if it hails? Will the glass shatter?

  2. Juanita says:

    love the idea warmer all winter

  3. Jeremiah says:

    I wonder how much it cost to do this vs. how much they save on their heating bills, How many winters of saved heating are needed to pay for it.

  4. Knz says:

    What happens in the summer? It would be sweltering

  5. Arjen says:

    Great idea. I plan to build my house wrapped in a geodesic quonset and use north side of hose house as a thermal heat mass store using rocks using the excess hot air in summer To heat said rocks.

  6. Joe says:

    This should have just built a greenhouse attached to the side of the house for their produce. Building a green over the house is wasteful and aesthetically retarded. Frankly i’m surprised they are not American.

  7. Joyce says:

    That’s interresting and all but think of all the window cleaner you have to buy lol.
    smudge prints and dirt. The rain can only wash so much.

    Very cool idea though.

    • Ryan says:

      The dirtier it gets, the more effective it would be for the greenhouse effect. so it would only be clean for the presentation.

  8. Robin says:

    Not a good idea…. Unless you love to live with mold. The humidity inside would be very high.

    • mike says:

      There’s very little humidity when the temps are that low.

    • Eric says:

      Robin, as long as there was proper circulation of air there would be little problem with mold. I live in a very humid climate and we have a high propensity for mold, my house has vents built in every room that circulates the air. the one bathroom with out a vent is the only one that has an issue with mold.

  9. Deez says:

    You are retarded…..must be American. It’s a brilliant idea.

  10. June Rodgers says:

    It would make them have a tropical climate in the summers. They live really far north so summers don’t get really hot there, their summer average is 67°

  11. June Rodgers says:

    They live in Stockholm, Sweden if you had read the article you’d know that though. Their hottest month is July and it only gets up to the mid 60’s and it’s in the 20’s for the winter. This is a genius idea for their location.

  12. Diane says:

    I had to look twice. There has been a very similar home in Omaha for decades. It’s managed to withstand blizzards, tornado activity, hot humid summers and Saturdays earthquake. They eventually took down some of the houses outside walls and put up some solar panels. It’s been there so long, I don’t even look at it when I drive by anymore.

  13. Camille says:

    I’m swedish and the only months with desent weather and temperature is june, july and august. We have to heat our homes from late september until may, sometimes it snows in april. The heating bills can be quite high during a year so normally go break even after 10-15 years.

  14. Laurie says:

    Love the idea. If it’s raining you still can enjoy being outside. Of course it’s not for everyone but it’s wonderful someone thought to try it.

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