How To Grow 168 Plants In A 6 X 10 Space With A DIY A-Frame Hydroponic System

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The techniques you can use for making gardening far easier than it actually is are not that many and in most cases not that accessible in terms of costs or work put into getting it. In order to succeed, you have to think outside the box! The hydroponic system is that one clever way to grow plants on a small area surface with not that much effort. In the project featured on this webpage you can see how a homemade vertical A-frame hydroponic system can surely help you growing your garden plants. Actually, the hydroponic system is one great method for growing herbs or other small plants, like radishes, lettuces or strawberries; for the last type it is way more attractive because you won’t have to stand on your knees and on the ground, but just pick them while standing up. Take the following video tutorial in order to make a working hydroponic system and be able to grow 168 plants on a 6 by 10 surface.

vertical-hydroponic-system-1 A permanent base types of NFT system with pvc pipe & downspouts

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vertical-hydroponic-system-3.1 With the use of Uni-Seals you can adjust your water level with ease. With new transplants you can raise the water level above net cup until roots form.

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vertical-hydroponic-system-12 Uni-Seals,A must have for any homemade Hydroponic System

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19 Responses to “How To Grow 168 Plants In A 6 X 10 Space With A DIY A-Frame Hydroponic System”

  1. Donuts says:

    Can you say something about the hydro solution you’re using?

    • Noel says:

      I would imagine that something like the masterblend fertilizer would work, it works in the Dutch buckets. The downfall to this pvc pipe system would be having to depend on a pump to be on all the time, in the event of a pump failure that standing water in the tubes would be used up quickly, but that is a concern for any hydroponic garden, pump burns out and nobody catches it and your done, with out any kind of an alarm or somethin, except for a wicking type of setup, like those Alaska buckets that also look like a good set up, At least with the buckets with media, you got the 1″ of saturated media to act as a buffer when at 1:00 that pump never turns on, hope I never have to put that to the test. How ever the s/d pipe is a good idea that I might try inside when winter comes.

      • JR Bailey says:

        Burned out pump could be a problem, but a decent software program could help with notification, and as far as power outage, a simply portable el cheapo solar system could be hooked in quite easily and cheaply (Harbour Freight variety)…….

    • Bob says:

      I have good luck with one gallon of compost tea to 55 gallons of water changed weekly.

  2. Rabelani Nemamilwe says:

    I realy like DIY, nice job

  3. Al says:

    Any reason not to drain the higher horizontal grow pipes into the lower horizontal grow pipes and just return the lowest grow pipe to your reservoir? Seems like it would reduce the amount of fittings and labor for construction

  4. Jürgen says:

    Al, remember your root zone needs to stay below 65 degrees to prevent root rot. First, I see no cooling mechanism in this system. Secondly, if you were to drain tier to tier, the tiers would get progressively warmer thru every tier. This design does allow for much more even temperatures.

  5. Lolli says:

    What else besides leafy greens can be grown in these systems? Veggies? Fruits?

  6. MUSAED ALSHATTI says:

    dear sir or madam
    your design for vertical hydroponic To Grow 168 Plants In A 6 X 10 Space With A DIY A-Frame Hydroponic System. is very nice how can i get the design thank you…….. MR MUSAED AL SHATTI

  7. Rodney says:

    if cooling is needed burying the tank. In most areas, the soil will be below 65 degrees at 1 foot deep. An 18 inch tank would buried to 16 inches would do fine. It also helps on cool nights as the water temperature will remain higher than the ambient air.

  8. jason says:

    I couldn’t refrain from commenting. Perfectly written!

  9. joke says:

    Apple trees, Avocado trees, mango . .. the bigger the better

  10. Connie hopple says:

    I love to have this .it is cool wow this is awesome and beautifull

  11. Padmore Clarke says:

    Hi Sir/ madam,
    My name is Padmore Clarke and am from Trinidad and Tobago, I will like to know if an a frame should be turned east west or north south. Best regards

    Padmore Clarke

  12. Sean says:

    Having already tested something similar and on smaller scale, one of the problems I ran into was that my drainage pipes would clog with roots leading to the longer/larger grow tubes overflowing. Haven’t you run into this problem? I notice all the plants in the pictures are just babies. Also, what about structural support for the plants? And what varieties of plants have you actually grown into adulthood? I’m very attracted to the idea, but I think there are might be some problems to troubleshoot.

  13. Ed says:

    How’s about a set of specific plans??? Doesn’t have to be free! Great job…

  14. Henry Fischer says:

    great idea… do u have the specs or plans oh the “A” frame.. would appreciate it very much.. i live in so florida.. i have a “winter garden” pots and raised bed.. i would like to add this to my garden.. hope u can help

    Thank You..

    Henry Fischer
    HENFISCHER@AOL.COM

  15. Onoda masaaki says:

    Excellent information

  16. John says:

    How many g/ hr do you run through and what size pump are you using?

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