Innovative Glass Roof Tiles Heat Your Home With Solar Energy

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High-efficiency is slowly becoming a prerequisite for homes, not a fab anymore. People choosing to resort to more eco-friendly alternatives have pushed innovation to a more accessible standard. Solar heating for example can be both efficient and stylish with these Glass Roof Tiles. Made by SolTech System, this combination of technology with ecology brings all home owners a definite advantage and makes them choose environmental-friendly materials often. The important thing to know about this particular type of roof tile is that it doesn’t need bright sunshine in order to function at high parameters. Check out how the entire system works from the following presentation and get a clearer picture of what a high-efficient home should look like. And be certain technological innovation has a beneficial effect on our lifestyles.

 

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“At a glance, the system consists of heavy duty transparent glass tiles encasing an insulated solar insulation system that combine to both convert solar energy as well as providing additional insulation within any building.” – SolTech Energy

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more details here…

 

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34 Responses to “Innovative Glass Roof Tiles Heat Your Home With Solar Energy”

  1. Tulessa says:

    I wish you guys had an office in Kentucky! 🙁

  2. Crimefighter says:

    Only good until the next hailstorm….

    • Gravlore says:

      Not so. The slopes of the glass is very strong. If the glass were flat then yes you would be correct.

    • Franz says:

      looks to be thicker than a pyrex bake pan, till th whole roof gets blown to crap in a tornado…

      • Delakando says:

        I worked as a glazier for a while so I could probably tell you a little more about this glass. Since the glass is curved I could say it would probably stand a better chance at protecting the solar cells from wind, rain, and hail unlike regular tempered glass or laminated glass. Tempering does provide good protection but if a piece of hail were to hit around the corner then the entire piece would just explode and leave the solar cell to get hit by the elements. If it was laminated then the glass would shatter but remain in place yet also block out the elements including sunlight so there wouldn’t be any use for the solar cell until that glass was replaced. Thick curved glass would definitely provide better protection even from a corner hit from a piece of hail.

      • angelique says:

        Other roofs will too be blown to crap by a tornado …. so what is the difference?

  3. Beverly says:

    Won’t it be too hot in the summertime?

  4. Eric says:

    Like the idea but as the previous post indicated, how strong are these glass tiles? I get hail in my neck of the woods too. I also have some small branches from the trees falling on the roof sometimes, though I would probably trim these back to get more sunlight.

  5. Matthew says:

    No price mentioned but $1,000,000/sq. ft. is a safe guess.

  6. ruthie says:

    Halestorms…too hot…too expensive…falling limbs, no wonder this country doesn’t make the progress others have. We immediately think of the obstacles…and retreat. Sad.

  7. Adriaan says:

    Looks great! No cracks over time? What about algea?

  8. Sergio says:

    In Argentina it would be good to use these tiles usually fall much hail.

  9. Scott says:

    They can’t be any less brittle then a clsy tile roof. My guess is its stronger but probably pretty ecpensive. I know davinci slate is 500/sq and they don’t heat your house.

  10. Denise B says:

    Height: 2 m
    Width: 1,5 m
    Weight: 5 kg
    €633.75

    That’s 347.61sq ft if my math is right, and $776.81, so that would ONLY cost me $14,600.54, and that’s just for the panels. Let me get out my checkbook.

  11. MJ says:

    If you follow the link, it tells you that they are about 6.5′ long by appr. 13″ wide at $10 a piece.

  12. PAM says:

    Good afternoon,

    Do you know if this product is also available in France? If yes, please give me the information.

  13. Joel says:

    I would like to assume that they are fairly resilient to wear and tear. Yes they may crack just like clay or ceramic tiles. The argument can be made that they may be just as strong if not stronger due to the fact that glass tiles can have inlays of fiberglass or even incorporate some from of plexiglass. Are you ever concerned of an air line passenger planes front windshield wgich contains many different layers of metals and fiberglass to enhance its strength. Probably not these tiles may infact be stronger than regular tiles. In my experience, working for a technology company producing something for the housing industry involves many steps and hundreds of thousands of dollars to fund. These applications are tested and tried and tested again in various settings and conditions to measure the environmental stress factors and potential life of a product to answer the potential risks of even creating such a product. Is it strong? Is profitable? Does it work? If any of these questions are not answered or fail to meet code the project is throw out or changed.

  14. Mark says:

    Wish they had something that would cool a house for us in the south.

  15. ina says:

    This semester to be a very good investment, I would love to get more info.

  16. Wade says:

    Do these let the light through? Could they roof an atrium or sunroom or are they dark underneath when used as an energy system?

  17. Marci says:

    Pinterest is not allowing the link as it might lead to spam -what?!?! I love this idea and I trust that it’s been designed to stand up to the weather. My business has a perfect southern exposure and I definitely want to look into this for when I am ready to invest in this upgrade to my shop!

  18. James says:

    these aren’t a new idea but not a bad one I reckon they ll be just about as strong as a concrete tile .

  19. Allen says:

    I followed the link to learn more and get a price. Unfortunately it was an ad to get your email and phone number without ever getting any info on anything

  20. loyd says:

    they’ve been making these tiles for years in Portugal. I have some on my roof in the Algarve. They get dirty real quick, algae etc. You couldn’t have more than a metre square on your roof or your house would become a furnace in summertime. I would say only really works in colder climates. They are strong at least as strong as clay tiles.

  21. Beverly Foreman says:

    wouldn’t lightening be a problem as well as hail?
    especially the golf ball or larger sized hail

  22. cheryl says:

    interested in solar roofing for mo,ne

  23. Kathleen O'Neill says:

    Hi, does the building have to be built with extra reinforcing to hold the weight of the tiles?

  24. Jeannette Altair says:

    I love this idea, but from reading, it appears the go on over tile type roofing and are not used as an actual skyroof. That’s why it boosts the insulation I’m sure. I would love to have a skyroof over several rooms. I think it would be fantastic to develop glass tiles with the underside coated in oneway film that would allow light in, protect from UV, protect furniture, and protect from excessive heat. Corning makes wonderful, thick glass. Maybe one day …

  25. Fie Dunn says:

    Can you buy these in Denmark?

  26. Derek says:

    When one of these breaks does ishe it electrically charged? just wondering for firefighters who are trying to ventilate these roofs, it would probably not be a good idea to even go up if the whole roof is charged in the glass, or can they be disconnected individually?

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