Yes, You Can Own A Fluffy Mini Cow And They Make Great Pets!

If you like cows but don’t have a farm, you can still buy an adorable mini cow as a pet. There are different breeds of mini cows that have fluffy fur and they remain tiny in size even when reaching adulthood.

There seem to be 26 breeds of mini cattle in the world, and they are often held as pets or for smaller-scale milk production. Tiny sized cows can have different colors and markings and depending on their size the price starts from $1,500.
You will also find a lot of farms across the USA that specialize in the breeding of mini cows and according to breeders they are very sociable and affectionate. A small-sized cow can be a great pet for children, as they have a pleasant temper, are cute and the kids are going to love them.
Having a mini cow as your best furry friend can also bring a lot of joy for the entire family and teach your children how to become responsible adults and animal lovers.

Even Howie Mandel loves mini cows!

Why Miniature Cows?

1. Mini cows are exceptional pets that demonstrate a great deal of affection, are very social, and are easy to take care of.
2. Miniature Cows are great tax write-offs for the small acreage farmer.
3. Mini cows will mow your small pastures, produce fertilizer, and are easily contained with a simple hot-wire.
4. Miniature cattle are a great inexpensive way to teach your children responsibility, and some very useful agricultural fundamentals. Their small size makes miniature cattle easy and safe to work with for any enthusiast.
5. Miniature cows do not require expensive handling equipment.
6. Miniature cattle can easily pay for themselves through the sale of calves and potential tax write-offs.
7. Miniature Cows can be a great business opportunity. Demand for good quality miniature cows is very high.
I currently have a waiting list that extends into 2021, and hope to be sold out by October this year. Miniature cows also make great petting zoo animals, and I use mine for local promotional events for companies. Feel free to contact me if you have any business questions.

Source: Lovable Little Ones

68 Comments

  • Lisa on said:

    A irresponsible post. “mini cows” are like “mini” pigs, there is no such thing. They are are kept small by nutritional deprivation and inbreeding -and they still grow up to be big. Can we please STOP breeding designer animals to satisfy human fancy??

    • Leslie on said:

      I totally agree. I have 4 “mini”pigs. All are rescues. Each weighs more than 125 lbs. One of them is a potbelly/farm mix and he is well over 250 lbs. No such thing as a micro, mini, teacup pig.

    • But I bet dogs are ok. And that sweet corn that’s GMO to grow in any condition that you buy at the store. And a lot of other things people seem to think is ok for. I think the word you’re looking for is “select breeding”, not inbreeding. And those cows look far from deprived. How about step foot on a farm before talking about something you know nothing of. For people that want to be self sufficient this would be the perfect breed for them without having a ton of land. It’s not about designer. It’s about self sustaining when everything goes to crap.

    • Parker on said:

      They do exist, just as not all pigs are 600lbs, some are 200lbs. They’re not dog sized cows but they’re not all 1200lb

    • Lenore Castaldo on said:

      You would have to find out if you need more than one. I think it’s a “herd” animal. They are not happy being alone. A friend had that problem with goats. Had to get another to keep the first one company.

  • Hi, liked your article on mini cows. I live in Wyoming and have an almost perfect set up for raising mini’s. Can you tell me of any special handling needs. I have 8 acres and assume they need shelter. We have severe winters here would they have special requirements? Also what type of vaccinations do they need? Are they sterile?

  • Nasser on said:

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  • Nuri on said:

    Que hermosas vaquitas mini, ¿cual es su costo? Tengo un jardin algo grande para que pueda estar contenta. No tengo niños pero si un nieto de cuatro años que estaría feliz con ella. ¿En que país están?.

  • Ellaina serfling on said:

    Interested. We have a tiny mini Pony and a couple goats would they get along okay in a pen with them?

  • Jennifer on said:

    This is a Horribly misleading post. Cattle are livestock, not pets and only as docile as you handle them and train them to be. My husband and I raise registered Highland cattle (which the photos are of) are still 500-600lbs as a miniature and up to 2600lbs as a full size. These cattle have HORNS and will kill you if you do not have the knowledge to train them properly. Just sticking them in Hotwire does not make them a good “ pet”. Please just stick to your goldfish and cats.

    • Windy Foster on said:

      Well Said, Jennifer! This is how the trouble starts. If you have to ask, “What’s the lowest price for a “mini” cow, then you cannot afford one, nor do you have any business caring for them. Is your property legally zoned for livestock? Do you have enough acreage to properly house a grazing animal? Do you know whether you have the right kind of grass, even? Do you know what their dietary needs are and what supplementation is required for your area? How much fresh water? What about shelter? Vaccinations? Worming? Hoof trimming? Does your local vet do Large Animal Medicine? Do they know how to reduce a displaced abomasum before your cute little investment dies a painful death right in front of you? Can you identify bloat? Grass Tetany? Dystocia? Prolapsed uterus? Milk fever? Hardware disease? A hoof abscess? A “mini” cow is still a COW! Unless you have experience raising livestock or you have enough money to hire someone who does, PLEASE, as the above poster suggested, stick to cats and goldfish!

  • Joanna Latham on said:

    Please send me info on where, how to purchase mini cows. The breeds you have and when can I put my name on the waitlist?

  • Rachel Oister on said:

    I am looking to adopt two of these cuddly critters. Please let me know how we do that? In our school district, we do not have a football team but a 4H club instead. I believe these would be perfect for our five year old to join and learn the responsibility required to care for them. She already wants to be a vet and has a worm farm. Lol. Please advise. Thank you.

  • You clearly have no clue what you are talking about , please shut up until you get a clue or a brain cell whatever comes first.

  • Jennifer, you are SO right! No matter what their sizes, they ARE cattle, and cows are not necessarily easy to train, tho most vows are faiy docile, they can get annoyed,.. and an angry cow is not what most people know how to handle.

    AND they will require much.more than a back yard to be happy

  • Kelly Ambron on said:

    Yes you should have experience with Bovine!! Yes you should make a life long decision on if you can care for them, provide what is needed and time with them as with any other member of your family! I would like more info on these particular cows? Would like one pregnant cow to grow old with my Mastiff’s and Danes,milk? I work from home.Please send info

  • Teri Piller on said:

    We have 13 acres. 8 of which are hay. We are planning on having mini goats, chickens, and a couple donkeys. We are in NE Washington state. Please contact me.

  • Marion on said:

    I absolutely agree with your post. Just irresponsible peopme promote poor animals like these creatures. Same mistake as with dogs, cats and pics in exame. First tbey are not healthy at all and mostly tbey grow more than thses breeders are promise. Is just a veey bad breeding habit and exactly this must be stopped in all areas of animal breding.

  • Marion on said:

    Yes they are cute creatures because that’s Scottish Highlanders, smaller than our Milk cows but still grow up normally and need to be kept in big fields and a stand but like to live outside even in winter because they are used to these weather conditions. So please, don’t buy them it makes just the seller happy

  • Mollie Suddeth on said:

    You are incorrect. There are actually 26 different breeds of mini cattle. I grew up on a cattle breeding farm. You can breed for any qualities you want. For instance, my father bred Limousine cattle in America, originally from the Limousine area of France. This breed was originally a red color but for the reason to make our herd to stand out within the breed, Dad wanted to breed them to be a black breed. (I personally loved the red color). He was quite successful in his endeavors but we stopped breeding in the ’80’s, right before he passed. We also showed our cattle in cattle shows across the USA. We were basically specialists in this breed. We were breeding this breed with in 20 years of the breed reaching the Canadian coast from France. They actually can be kept as pets. I have personally trained cattle to show at shows and these were full sized cattle about 1500 pounds. First, you have to train them to walk on a leash. They get their food documented. They get regular baths, regular grooming, vaccines, veterinarian care. All things you do for your dog. 4H kids in clubs have to document this for their projects. I had one show calf that, when in a lying position, I could sit leaning against him and read a book. So, FYI, kids living in farms in America do this as an everyday part of their lives. I certainly thought of my 1500# calf as a pet!
    There are at least three or more breeds, that I am aware of that are a smaller breed of regular cattle which were probably originally used to breed a smaller breed like the mini-cattle. These are Charolais, Hereford and Scottish Highland cattle These are very old breed. This is how new breeds are made, using selective qualities from a dam and sire until you’ve developed what you want. This process is the same for mini-pigs. Look up mini-pig association for information on that.
    There is one situation in cattle breeding that does abuse calves and that is dairy cattle operations. Their cattle are bred and calved for the need to keep them in milk. The calves are removed and put in a little house for calves. They are bottle fed by the farmer and eventually sold for veal. Not all dairy farmers do that though.
    So, as you see, they aren’t usually bred to satisfy peoples whims. Breeding is a specific type of farming and is not something anyone is interested in inbreeding. Registered cattle all have papers that tell the provenance of each particular line.

  • Mollie Suddeth on said:

    You are incorrect. There are actually 26 different breeds of mini cattle. I grew up on a cattle breeding farm. You can breed for any qualities you want. For instance, my father bred Limousine cattle in America, originally from the Limousine area of France. This breed was originally a red color but for the reason to make our herd to stand out within the breed, Dad wanted to breed them to be a black breed. (I personally loved the red color). He was quite successful in his endeavors but we stopped breeding in the ’80’s, right before he passed. We also showed our cattle in cattle shows across the USA. We were basically specialists in this breed. We were breeding this breed with in 20 years of the breed reaching the Canadian coast from France. They actually can be kept as pets, 4H kids do it every year with different calves.. I have personally trained cattle to show at shows and these were full sized cattle about 1500 pounds. First, when they are young you have to train them to walk on a leash. They get their food documented. They get regular baths, regular grooming, vaccines, veterinarian care. All things you do for your dog. 4H kids in clubs have to document this for their projects. I had one show calf that, when in a lying position, I could sit leaning against him and read a book. So, FYI, kids living in farms in America do this as an everyday part of their lives. I certainly thought of my 1500# calf as a pet!
    There are at least three or more breeds, that I am aware of that are a smaller breed of regular cattle which were probably originally used to breed a smaller breed like the mini-cattle. These are Charolais, Hereford and Scottish Highland cattle These are very old breed. This is how new breeds are made, using selective qualities from a dam and sire until you’ve developed what you want. This process is the same for mini-pigs. Look up mini-pig association for information on that.
    There is one situation in cattle breeding that does abuse calves and that is dairy cattle operations. Their cattle are bred and calved for the need to keep them in milk. The calves are removed and put in a little house for calves. They are bottle fed by the farmer and eventually sold for veal. Not all dairy farmers do that though.
    So, as you see, they aren’t usually bred to satisfy peoples whims. Breeding is a specific type of farming and is not something anyone is interested in inbreeding. Registered cattle all have papers that tell the provenance of each particular line.

  • Mary Drouillard on said:

    I would love to keep a mini cow on our 10 acres in Northern Michigan, USA. Where is the closest supplier to Michigan?

  • Logan on said:

    Shut the fuck up tree hugger. If you don’t like it, stay off the page. Some of us embrace ANY animal, no matter what it is or how it came to be. You dumb ass tree huggers are all the same. I bet you are from California and I bet you voted for Biden and you are against gun ownership. You people are the “sensitives”. Grow a pair of balls!!! Pussy….

  • And you know this because of you extensive knowledge and experience with mini cattle? Ignorant people just need to do more listening and less talking. Moron…..

  • Raina Fox on said:

    How much are they? Where are you located? Also, how big do they actually grow? How much do they weigh estimated at the adult age. I don’t want to buy a mini cow like I did a mini potbelly pig and it weighed almost 250 lbs when it was done growing. I don’t want any surprises with the cows. Do you have any available or do you still have a waiting list.

  • Anastasia on said:

    Personally everyone has their own opinion, I personally refuse to eat meat for my love of animals. That’s just me I love cows immensely since I was a little girl, I’ve always dreamed of having one someday. To me there more than just some animal you slaughter and eat, personally I find it vulgar how the people talk about animals like there not important at all and act like they don’t have feelings. How would it feel if the table was turned and instead humans were eaten by animals without any choice. Think about that for a minute, not everyone has to believe what others do it’s why “the freedom of speech was made.

  • Suzy Moren on said:

    Lisa..research before you post an opinion! Mini Cattle are NO T like mini pigs, they ARE legitimate breeds favored for small production beef operations. Mini pigs also are real breeds. The problem with mini pig’s isn’t the breed, but dishonest humans promising ridiculous tiny sizes. By definition, a mini pig is any breed with an adult size if less than 400 pounds! BTW, you can have a good pet pig if you put in the time to train them, but most people don’t. A mini cow isn’t a pet! Mini cows are a smaller breed of cow and only belong on farms.

  • Rebekah on said:

    Lol…you mean I can’t feed my cow leftover casserole, keep it in an apartment, and ignore its health. They don’t actually need space and grass.

  • Jenny Mertes on said:

    These photos are CALVES, not the adult cattle, which range from 3′ to 4′ tall. Don’t be deceived into thinking your pet or backyard farm animal will be tiny, cute, and fluffy when it’s fully grown.

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